Friday, January 20, 2017

Scary truth about America's diet RANT (food waste & unhealthy food consumption)

According to Ecowatch:"90 percent of the foods humans eat come from just 30 plants. Out of tens of thousands of plants we could eat, mankind chooses to consume only about 30 of them. It’s crazy to contemplate how limited our diets are compared to all of the different foods we could be eating".
A diet of 30 plants that humans consume is less worrisome that Michael Pollan's argument.
As mentioned in my post on re-wilding yourself with wild edibles, Michael Pollan has much to discuss on this subject. Pollan in In Defense of Food, says that the majority of American's calories come from 4 foods: wheat, sugar, soy, and corn. However he also mentions that another big portion of the calories come from dairy and meat products as you can see in the pie chart below from Food is Medicine.

US Food ConsumptionMany health gurus tell you to eat simple, and this makes intuitively like eating an apple. I consider my diet simple as far as eating a large variety of fruits, vegetables, greens, grains, beans, nuts, seeds, but this means that I'm get a variety of vitamins and minerals. The kind of simplification in the typical American's diet is excluding these health foods for diet that is simplified to a handful of the same ingredients for every meal with a different arrangement of those ingredients.



Let me be clear: I do not fault an individual for the availability and price of unhealthy processed foods. Actually, there is much to say about the way food is distributed such as grocery gaps where urban and rural areas have to travel up to 20-50 miles to get a grocery store. Considering this, there are family dollar stores, gas stations, and liquor stores in close proximity to the poor urban and rural regions of this country. I can protest all day to avoid putting your dollar in these big corporations that are making you and your family unhealthy. And let me also be clear: just because your skinny, doesn't mean your healthy; and just because you're fat, doesn't mean your unhealthy.
In considering all of this, who do we look to that created this unhealthy industry? Do the CEOs and head management eat the crap that they sell in stores? Does Doritoes eat Doritoes? Do these people that run the corporations let their children sit in front of the TV and watch the food ads they put on TV to brainwash children?
It's similar, but not quite the same way cigarettes are sold. There is a warning label on cigarettes, but the only labels on packaged foods are those that are deceiving you into thinking it's a health food. Healthy food is a whole food like fresh fruits and vegetables.

The limited ingredients in a diet is just the least of our worries, because a much more pressing issue is that 40% of U.S. food is wasted, equating to $165 billion a year in waste according to CNN. This means that there IS enough food to feed the world, and the problem isn't an expanding population where the globe cannot produce enough food for everyone. This is another problem with corporations: they're producing too much food, and distributing too much food in the most consumer-heavy regions. Of course packaged food has a "long shelf life", which basically mean there isn't any nutrition left. So, let's consider what food is wasted the most. I worry, though, that when people do attempt to eat fruits and vegetables, this food typically goes to waste. 
 As mentioned, packaged food that can be preserved with a longer shelf life than fresh, raw fruits and vegetables, is a mixture of those same ingredients of meat, dairy, wheat, corn, soy, and sugar. Because these foods are highly processed, thus their raw, fresh form loses the nutrients and minerals that once was there before the processing. The solution to unhealthy food consumption and food waste isn't to grow more, sell more, or donate more. The solution lies within the power structure. This may sound like a radical idea, but by giving people and families their own land to grow their own food will be part of the solution.
This further angers me because there is the safety of pesticides and GMO foods argument that we need these technological innovations to ensure we have enough food and no money is wasted--well, isn't that a laugh when we consider that people deliberately are wasting food, and corporations continue to over produce and over sell foods. Not only is food wasted and chemicals used becomes unnecessary, but fuel and transportation become wasted. And lets get real about the land we use for what: where we have hundreds of acres of wheat, corn, and soy being grown exclusively for the fattening of cows, chickens, pigs, and animals to get fat on their unnatural diet in order for humans to consume them.

Of course there are many solutions, but we cannot keep making the same mistake of selling and growing more, because the problem is where the food is getting distributed, as mentioned by National Geographic: "the richer the nation, the higher its per capita rate of waste." National Geographic also states that: "To compound the environmental insult, food buried in the airless confines of dumps generates methane, a greenhouse gas far more potent than carbon dioxide. If global food waste were a country, it would be the third largest generator of greenhouse gases in the world behind China and the United States."
 Restaurant buffets are notorious for food waste. In fact the other day as I watched my mother and sister eat at a Chinese restaurant, we examined a family that continued to get food from the buffet that they ended up leaving there to be thrown away. My mother, sister, and I were furious at this, to the point we wanted to take the food (because we watched, and the food wasn't touched). 

Additionally, we have to refuse a global food corporation like McDonalds taking over America,  India, Asia, and Africa. We got to refine the food market, but the food shall not be refined! 
The solution is not necessarily individuals taking their business elsewhere, it is a matter of a culture shift and changing our perspective about the kinds of food we want to sustain the planet that works with this planet.

Common Tomato Plant Ailments & Pests



Original post @ Organic Tomato Garden Tips to read full article, in addition to Using Hydrogen Peroxide with added information.

Early Blight

"Caused by a fungus Alternaria solani, early blight is also known as target spot or alternaria leaf spot. Signs of early blight are loss of leaves on the lower part of the plant and brown or black spots that are 1/4 to 1/2 inch in diameter that appear on lower leaves. Spots often merge and form odd-shaped blotches and may look like a target. Leaves will fade to yellow and dry up. Early blight often attacks the tomato as well, leaving large black concave areas on the tomatoes. Warm damp weather helps spread early blight. Fungicide is used to control early blight. Follow manufacturer’s instructions when using any fungicide on your plants.
Verticillium Wilt
"The fungi Venticillium albo-atrum and Verticillium dahlie are the cause of verticillium wilt. Small yellow patches appear on the lower leaves of the plant and, eventually, as the disease spreads upwards, leaves turn yellow, wither and drop. Verticillium wilt also causes the internal browning of the stem near the soil line. Infected plants can survive but their growth is often stunted and their crop yield is lower. Controlling verticillium wilt is difficult; no fungicidal treatment has been effective. The best way to prevent verticillium wilt is to choose tomato plants that are not susceptible to the disease. Look for tomato plants or seeds that are labeled “V” for verticillium-resistance. The Better Boy, Big Beef, Roma and Early Girl are a few varieties of tomato that resist verticillium wilt."

Bacterial Spot

"Bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria causes bacterial spot. This disease appears as brown spots on the leaves and stems of the tomato plant. The splotches are about 1/8 inch across and feel slightly slimy to the touch. As the spots begin to grow they often appear to be surrounded by a yellow halo. Once spots become abundant, they will grow together and cause the leaves to turn brown and wither. Bacterial spot can affect the fruit of the plant. Black dots will appear on the tomato and will enlarge to 1/4 to 1/2 inch in width and become sunken, gray and scab-like. Keep areas around tomato plants weed-free to help reduce the chance of bacteria growth. Fungicide is effective in controlling bacterial spot. Follow manufacturer’s instructions when using fungicides on your plants."

Bacterial Canker

"Plants infected with bacterial canker often appear to have the disease on only one side. Eventually the disease does spread to the entire plant. Caused by a bacterium Clavibacter michiganesis subsp. michiganesis, bacterial canker can cause extensive damage to your tomato crop. Young plants will suddenly wilt and older plants will experience browning along the edges of their leaves. In rare occasions, the stems of the plant will develop cavities or brown cankers. Raised white spots may occur on tomatoes, sometimes called birds-eye-lesions, and the white spots will turn brown as it ages. Control bacterial canker by planting disease-free plants and keep areas weed free to reduce chances of bacterial growth. Copper spays have little effect on the bacterial canker and, most likely, will not stop the spread of the disease".

Septoria Leaf Spot

"Septoria leaf spot is caused by Septoria lycopersici. The first symptoms are small, water-soaked spots. The spots grow to about 1/8 inch in diameter, then develop grayish-white centers. The edges then turn dark. The spores of this fungus are spread through rain and from watering from above. Eventually, the leaves turn yellow and fall off. While the infection can invade the plant at any time, it is most commonly seen after the plant sets fruit, according to the University of Iowa. Control septoria leaf spot by planting healthy plants with the proper amount of space between them, watering at the base of the plants, watering in the morning, removing dead and decaying branches, and keeping any fallen plant debris cleaned up"

Aphids

"One of the most common pests on tomatoes is the aphid. Aphids suck the sap of the plant causing misshapen foliage and fruit. Introducing beneficial insects into the garden can help this problem. The natural predators of aphids are laceywings and ladybugs.
Hornworms
"Hornworms are a green caterpillar with small black spots and two protruding antennae on their heads. They eat foliage and the tomatoes and can do a lot of damage before you find them. The best defense against hornworms is to go in your garden often and pick them off the plants... Another remedy is to sprinkle flour on the tomato plants."

Cutworms and whitefly

"Cutworms damage tomatoes by cutting the stems. If you see this damage on your plants use wood ashes on the ground around the stems. Another common pest is the whitefly, which makes the tomato leaves yellow and distorted. Laceywings and ladybugs are also effective for this insect, as well as spraying with garlic oil or using yellow sticky traps."

Blossom end rot 

"A water-soaked spot at the blossom end of tomato fruits is the classic symptom of blossom-end rot. This relatively common garden problem is not a disease, but rather a physiological disorder caused by a calcium imbalance within the plant." Some gardeners suggest using eggshells because it contains calcium, but other gardeners protest that using eggshells is not useful because the shells take time to break down. In turn, they suggest keeping consistent soil moisture around the plant. Frequency or amount of water is not key, just consistency. Additionally, "Excess ammonial types of nitrogen in the soil can reduce calcium uptake as can a depleted level of phosphorus" according to one user at a garden forum here. This user also suggested Tums tablets, which I would consider Calcium vitamins as a handy "supplement" to the plant/soil if you have nothing else on hand.

Companion planting

"Traditional gardening wisdom teaches that certain plants grown together create mutual strength and disease resistance. Companion planting is one way to create a disease-resistant tomato plant.  Tomatoes become more disease free and pest resistant when planted near onions, nasturtiums, marigolds, asparagus, carrots, parsley, and cucumber. Basil repels whiteflies. Dill and borage repel hornworms."

Organic Insect Spray

"Garlic and pepper is an all-purpose bug spray for common tomato plant problems such as aphids and hornworms. Its strong odor keeps many insects away. This spray also stops mildew.
Organic Fungicide
"Baking soda has been found to have fungicidal properties. Baking soda spray is effective for tomato blight, powdery mildew, and as a general fungicide. Use as a preventative or when blight problems have already developed. An effective mixture is baking soda, vegetable oil, and Castile soap. Another popular organic fungicide is an apple cider vinegar and water mixture."

*Peroxide is another useful ingredient in the garden regarding health and prevention. This is because peroxide "works by releasing oxygen. It acts as an oxygen supplement for plants. It seems to really support both good health and strong growth for plants.
Hydrogen peroxide can also help with soil fungus: it aerates the soil, and it is anti-fungal. (It is also anti-bacterial)" according to Using Hydrogen Peroxide. Additionally, peroxide works as a General fertilizer, either in plant water or sprayed on foliage. Secondly, peroxide helps sick plants, which can be applied by using a Spray bottle on the leaves and add to water. Mold or fungus on plants or in the soil can be controlled by using Hydrogen peroxide on plants or in the soil. If you’ve got mold on the plant, spraying the leaves is probably best. Third, Hydroponic gardeners often use peroxide to feed plants, by adding it to the watering system. Also, a Peroxide Spray on tree cuts, helps prevent infection. Peroxide as a spray in the greenhouse controls mold and mildew. Sprouting seeds before planting using water and peroxide that seeds soak in for seeds to sprout faster and grow stronger. Rooting cuttings appreciate the added peroxide in water, if you’ve put the cuttings directly into water before planting. Or, if you’ve put the cuttings into soil or medium, use peroxide in the water you’re using to water the cuttings with.

*Epsom salt as a fertilizer for tomatoes as well. A healthy plant that is more mature will be less susceptible to pests and/or pathogens. Overall, Pest control for tomatoes begins with creating nutrient-rich soil so plants are strong and resistant to disease. Add organic compost to soil before planting.

Compost Tea Spray

"Keep blight and other pathogens away from tomato plants with a compost tea mixture to spray on affected leaves. It is also used as a soak around the base of the plant. Compost is rich in microorganisms that have anti-viral and anti-fungal properties. Dilute the compost/water mixture and let it sit for 1 week before use to ensure that plants are not burned".

Beneficial Insects

"Ladybugs, praying mantis, and lacewings are known as “beneficials” and they are a very effective organic pest control for tomato problems. They eat the insects which chew and destroy tomato plants, such a flea beetles and aphids."

*You can attract beneficial insects through creating their ideal environment. Recently I posted examples of ways other gardener made "bug hotels" that attract these insects, here: Beneficial insect/bug hotel ideas

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Indoor Hanging potted plants

The 3M Command strips with plastic hook holds potted plants, and it's easy to put up, fast, and inexpensive. As long as the potted plants are small and light, the plastic hook should hold the plant for a long time. I have been using mine for for months for a potted String of Bananas plant.
Below are more examples of the unique ways to grow a garden indoors using a hanging method.

ultimatehomeideas.com


blog.comfree.com


ludetz.com

he 3M Command strips with a plastic hook holds potted plants well as long at they're small and light. I have been using mine for months for a potted String of Bananas plant.
1decor.net


homesthetics.net

gardenersgazette.blogspot.com

crafterholic.blogspot.com

stylizen.com

innbrooklyn.wordpress.com

galleryhip.com

howdiyblog.com

room-decorating-ideas.com

butterbin.com
avso.org

muchpics.com
cutenareta.com

decorationstree.com
interiorcollective.com
thegreatestgarden.com

Keyhole Gardens (how to & design)

The structure of the keyhole gardens is to create a circular compost pile. Around the compost, soil is to be surrounded in a U shape built up using stacked rocks or another barrier to hold the soil around the compost. As rain falls through the compost, the nitrogen and other minerals from the compost will be slowly released like a liquid fertilizer into the soil.
The first step in making a keyhole garden is either making the cylindrical compost hole with mesh, wire, or some kind of fencing.
Secondly, make the outer frame with bricks, rocks, wood, or other materials to contain the soil. Shape the frame like a U so that you can walk in the space.
Third, lay down cardboard at the bottom of the garden to suppress weeds.
Fourth, begin by adding soil in the garden, and fill the compost cage with food scraps.

Below are examples of the many ways gardeners have made keyhole gardens.

libertygarden.us
libertygarden.us

university of bristol

flickr.com

inhabitat.com
vcmga.org
almostancientpots.com

keyholefarm.com
vitagardens.com
pinterest.com
vermicomposters.ning.com
niftyhomestead.com

niftyhomestead.com
sandiegouniontribune.com

African Raised Keyhole garden bu The Shaster Foundation. Drought proof, flood proof and perfect for people who don't like or can't bend or dig. Feeds a family of 6 all year round in any kind of weather.
imgur

Re-wild yourself by eating wild edibles (list of wild edibles to eat)

As I read a little bit of Michael Pollan's book "In defense of food", his overall health advice was to eat the foods that grow wild around us in our own environment. His argument was that when we eat the foods around us that grow wild are those that help us adapt to the environment and prevent diseases. Pollan concludes from researching cultures that it's important to follow cultural practices in consuming food rather than food science. Additionally, the soil and plant in the wild is cleaner than that grown in the big-Ag industry with all of its spray chemicals. Because the soil in the woods has more nutrients for years of composting leaf matter and other natural fertilizing, the edible foods are more nutritious, and have a diverse range of nutrients whereas the typical store-bought food is the same mix of ingredients of wheat and sugar components in a very strict ratio with no nutrition left after processing. Although it does not have quite the vegan or ethical message as far as what I usually highlight on this blog, I do see merit in his argument. I highly recommend reading this book, so request a copy from your local library.

In considering this from Pollan's argument, I find that I also strive to eat this way considering I do a lot of foraging behind my house. My Family and people around Kentucky, especially where I live, hunt for food like deer, fish, squirrel, turkey, and so that's their way of eating life that is around them in their environment.
Because I eat vegan, the wild foods I have eaten are fruits, nuts, greens/herbs, and mushrooms. Apparently there is a App on iTunes for Vegan recipes of wild edibles here: The Wild Vegan.

In past posts on wild edibles, I have shown you that I forage for mushrooms in the woods, as well as berries and paw paw fruits. Typically the kinds of mushrooms that grow behind my house are Chanterelle mushrooms and Chicken of the Woods, in the pictures below.
chanterelles foraged in kentucky woods

chanterelle & chicken of the woods mushrooms forage
Foraging Chanterelle & Chicken of the woods mushrooms in July
For more pictures of the mushroom foraging in the past years, go to the links provided at the end of this post.

Another mushroom found in Kentucky is Morels. When I was a kid, my Dad and I foraged for these and later he fried them and ate them with ketchup. This how I ate them growing up. I haven't had Morels in a long time because they grow early in the season, and I haven't come across a patch of Morels around my house. Because Chanterelles and Chicken of the woods grow behind my house, those are what I forage the most. I eat these types of mushrooms by tearing them into strips and frying them with a little oil, salt and pepper, served over rice or noodles.
michpics.wordpress.com

Other wild edibles of Kentucky, and perhaps around you too, are Paw paw fruit trees. Last fall I found one paw paw growing among a young, new patch of Paw paws behind my house. The paw paw fruit never grew to a proper size to eat, but when it was so ripe it turned brown and black, I ate a piece and found it to be very tasty, like caramel or something.
pinstopin.com

Of course other wild edible fruits in the woods are berries. They are very easy to identify unlike mushrooms, but some berries can be questionable, however, I have found that I can trust the look of wild black berries and wild raspberries in the woods. Because there is a lot of land behind my house that I explore, I always find blackberries and raspberries to forage and eat. One year I foraged so many berries that I was able to make 10 half pints of jam. Another berry I love and forage around my house is dewberries. They look like blackberries, except they grow on a small vine that crawls across the ground. Typically they are larger than a blackberry.
Autumn berry, wild edible:
autumn olive berry pinterest.com
Another berry I like to forage for is huckleberry. It looks like similar to a blueberry plant but the berries are darker and tiny. Of course, the huckleberries around you may be different, considering I'm listing wild edibles I eat in Kentucky.
Many people have heard of this fruit because of Huckleberry Finn, but many have not explored the woods to eat this berry. And it's certainly not a berry we find in the grocery store, much like other wild foods.

The berries listed are typically harvested around July and August. Whereas the Autumn Olive, which as the name implies, is harvested in the fall, around September. I have not tried the Autumn Olive, but realized I have many of these plants growing around my house.
Elderberry is easily identifiable, usually growing along the side of the road like Autumn Olive plants (from what I've noticed). Elderberry is bitter, and eating these may require a lot of sugar or some kind of processing.

elderberry showmeoz.wordpress.com
arcadianabe.blogspot.com

 Persimmons is another wild native fruit that all animals, including me, love to eat. The persimmons around here are very small compared to California and Asian persimmons that are large. I have noticed two different varieties of persimmons I have foraged where I live: one being a flavor like pumpkin pie (which is a similar flavor to the Hachiya and Fuyu persimmons); and the second being a flavor like orange icy pops.
foraged persimmons from kentucky

black raspberry forage in kentucky

blackberry and dewberry (right) forage

There are so many wild greens that are edible as well like ramps, dandelions, and chickweed. This young gentlemen, Sergei in the photo below, has a book on wild edibles titled "Wild Edibles" and apparently it's quite popular, so it seems to be a worthy purchase for those that want to take on this challenge of eating wild edibles. What he does with his wild edibles, I'm not quite sure, but I thought that he and his family were raw vegans, so I can imagine a lot of the greens are used for salads, smoothies, and juices. I would eat the greens all these ways including frying them.

idrinkyourwine.com

Of course nut trees are plentiful, typically around property lines, but some remain in the woods for the squirrels to eat. Some of the wild nut trees around here are hickory and beechnut. There are many others such as Walnuts and pecans that I harvest from on peoples' property lines.

Where I live, there is a lot of logging for nut trees, so the woods has become a place of destruction. I am afraid that some of these wild foods like Paw paws may become extinct the more logging that is done. Because of clear cutting, Paw paws and other trees may not survive the logging industry due to equipment/machinery completely killing any other tree that would not have been cut for the logging company. It seems nothing is safe in its path. We must demand an alternative to clear cutting woods and forests, and oil businesses that also clear cut, and shopping malls and other projects that devastate the landscape. We must demand a different path to protect ecosystems, wildlife, and protect wild native plants.

Other related posts are provided below to find more information and pictures of foraging wild edibles, including more pictures of BIG foraging hauls of Chanterelle and Chicken of the woods mushrooms:

Late July Garden harvests (Peaches ... 
Foraging Chanterelle & Chicken of the woods mushrooms in July
BIG Garden Harvest in late August ...
Heirloom Solar Flare & Gold Berries ... 
Chanterelle mushrooms from the woods!
Rain for weeks grows BIG mushrooms ...
Foraging for Wild Edibles (Fall & Winter)
Pawpaw flower & Fruit identification ...
Apple, Persimmon, & Nut Foraging in ...
10 remarkably useful plants you can find in the wild
List of Uncommon Cold Hardy Fruit ... 


Similar to what Michael Pollan was speaking about with diet, Markus Rothkranz, a health "guru", has created this short video I have posted below which discusses the healing properties of wild edibles further as Pollan had.


If we study the forest and mimic our agriculture after natural systems, we can learn how to grow food. By focusing on building soil with organic matter, using cover crops and planting a wide diversity of crops, we can create abundant foodscape on any scale.

Plastic bottle water reservoir delivery system


Original post @ Tomato plants like deep watering. Why waste water when you can make a simple reservoir delivery system. Neat idea. The photo says it all.

11 Recycled & Natural materials for Free Trellis & Arbor ideas


The fun in gardening is to utilize what is around you, and how you can create beautiful works of art that are functional. This is especially worthwhile when you're choosing materials that can be recycled or "upcycled" when creating structure. Much of the recycled materials are metal or plastic that can be found around your yard, house, inside, flea markets, etc. Of course is better to use Natural materials such as wood fiber in making trellises and arbors, but this post is directed to those that want to recycle materials as well as use natural materials in the garden. Below is a list of those materials to use in creating fencing, trellises, and arbors that are functional in the garden, but also create a sense of artistry and decoration.
naturalfencing.com

1. Wattle fencing: Many gardeners trellis vining fruits with wire fencing, while others use wood framing. Of course natural materials is the best choice. I recommend the Wattle method in which wood has been woven into fencing. Wattle fencing can be used for a trellis, arbor, or raised bed.
According to Inspiration Green on wattle fencing, "The upright stakes are sometimes called sales and the saplings called 'weavers'Hazel, willow, sweet chestnut, plum, forsythia or any supple, long, straight, slender saplings make good weavers. Newly cut, green wood is best and easiest. Willow is an exception as it can be soaked to become more supple. Use thin, long branches -or- larger saplings that are cut down the center (cleft) as 'weavers'...The saplings you choose should be long enough to weave around at least three stakes (preferably more) for stability. The weavers are woven around the 'sales' like basketry. The simplest weave would be to weave each row of saplings alternating around the stakes, the next row is woven on the opposite side of the stake from the sapling below it. Each sapling row should be firmly pressed down".
decorhacks.com
For a tutorial on making Wattle fencing, watch this video: here.

Besides wattle fencing, other natural materials or recycled materials to use for constructing trellises and arbors include:
2. Crutches. Actually there is a pair of crutches at my house, and I have always wondered what to do with them. And I have considered using them in the garden. In the picture here, I just so happened to come across a picture of a gardener's usage of crutches in the garden.

3. Bicycle wheels. I find it very easy to accumulate bicycles wheels when families buy several bicycles at one time for everyone to ride. With plenty of wheels, you can create a vertical structure in the garden. There are many examples of gardeners using bicycle wheels in the garden, and below is a picture of the best example I could find.

diyrecycled.com

 4. Recycled metal bars, poles, or gates like in the picture below. And, much fencing found around my neck of the woods, is a lot of old metal wire like bed springs. So this is another useful material for a trellis structure to grow vining crops.

recyclinggardenmom.blogspot.com
5. Screen door. Whether it's a screen door, or a bed spring, metal head board, or metal bed frame, these materials can be used in the garden for a vertical trellis. I have also used, as you can see in my garden posts from last season, that I used the wood framing of my old baby crib to grow peas, pumpkins, and other squash.

refurbished-ideas.com
hgdiy.com

pic2fly.com
dishfunctionaldesigns.blogspot.com

fleamarketgardening.org

6. Tobacco sticks & wood posts can be found in old barns, and sometimes you will come across a farmer friend that is willing to let you borrow or have their old tobacco sticks. For years I have used tobacco sticks or wood posts to create trellis structures. Below are pictures of the past ways I have used tobacco sticks and wood posts in my gardens.






7. Wooden ladders are perfect for creating a natural trellis and arbor. I recommend looking further into ladder trellis gardening, because there are some beautiful little creations out there. Oh lord, I'm starting to sound like Bob Ross (I watched a lot of Bob Ross this winter and created Bob Ross inspired paintings you can see here: Holiday gift paintings.)

Re-purposed Ladder Becomes Trellis:
pinterest.com


northwestgardener.net



8. Wood Pallets of course are very useful in the garden.

pinterest.com

9. Even a recycled water drum that has the metal cage on the outside will grow a vining plant. Two years ago, I grew Luffa gourds on a water drum which used the metal cage to vine. Look in your shed, look in the woods, look around your yard, house, or other scrap/junk yards for recycled materials that will allow you to assemble a trellis or arbor structure.



10. Bamboo is a durable material when dried. And usually bamboo is plentiful considering even in Kentucky where there is cold winters, we have bamboo growing invasive in places around creeks.
Bamboo is great for creating small trellis structures. I have used bamboo in the past as a natural material to trellis peas, but the bamboo was cut early and had not been given any time to dry out, so I recommend this step before using bamboo.

11. Golf clubs or any metal pole. 

pinterest.com


Of course, there are many more materials that work for creating a trellis or arbor in your garden. It's up to to explore your surroundings and to be unique.